The degree program provides students with coursework in relevant subjects such as animal nursing, veterinary radiology, and clinical pathology.

Degree Benefits:

  • Veterinary Technicians generate an annual median salary of $36,260*
  • Projected job growth rate of 15% for Veterinary Technicians*

Career Options Include:

  • Veterinary Technologist
  • Pet Clinic Manager
  • Animal Shelter Representative

*Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Veterinary Technologists and Technicians, on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/veterinary-technologists-and-technicians.htm (visited March 24, 2022).

Find an online bachelor's or master's degree:

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

While this answer used to be four years to earn a B.S. Degree in Veterinary Technology, this was when most students attended their classes on-campus full time. Now, students have some additional choices, including the online option. Depending on how an individual university has this structured, an undergraduate student who takes at least 15 credit hours each semester can earn their degree in close to four years. However, most students decide to take only the minimum 12 credit hours per semester. This makes their program run close to five or even six years. Depending upon how flexible the university is with courses being offered (and how long a term or semester runs), students can anticipate graduating in five years, on average.

Before choosing a major there are some important facts you should know about.


In general, you can begin your career as a Veterinary Technology by earning a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) or a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in Veterinary Technology, but in many cases for the position you are seeking you may need to obtain a master's degree in Veterinary Technology. Furthermore, there are numerous specializations and subfields associated with a major in Veterinary Technology. You will want to research the college or university to determine if they have the major you are considering.


This is a very important question to ask yourself. Your major should play a big part in the schools you are considering. Not every college may offer the major of your choice, so doing your homework is the first step of the selection process.

Before you declare a major in Veterinary Technology, you should have an idea of what kind of timeframe you're looking at. If you are trying to achieve an associate degree, you will only need to finish about 60 credit hours over 2 years. However, if you are going for you bachelor's (B.S. or B.A.) degree in Veterinary Technology, you will need to complete 120 credit hours over four years. And, if you want to attain a master's degree as well, you will have to finish your bachelors first and then spend around 2 years completing 60 more credit hours. Some of the coursework you will find in typical Veterinary Technology degrees are:

  • Global Health at the Human-Animal-Ecosystem Interface
  • Ecology: Ecosystem Dynamics and Conservation
  • Animal Behaviour and Welfare
  • Antimicrobial Resistance - Theory and Methods
  • Advanced Diploma in Business Starting Up (Animal Care)
  • Dairy Production and Management
  • General Pathophysiology
  • Equine Welfare and Management
  • Sustainable Food Production Through Livestock Health Management
  • Epidemics - the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases

Currently, students enrolled in four-year universities have less than a 50% chance of graduating within four years. Statistics vary from university to university, but many students are graduating closer to the 6-year range.


If you want to be one of the lucky 40% who do graduate in your fourth year, you'll need to make a few sacrifices. First, you'll have to take more than the minimum 12 credit hours per semester. Take 15 credits per semester, because you'll finish earning the required credits in around four years.


Go to school each summer session. Take at least one class per summer semester. Not only will you be sure to graduate on time, but you may also benefit with lower per-credit tuition charges, as well.


Declare a major as soon as you can. You won't be moving from major to major this way. If you have to work for gas or rent, work for the fewest number of hours per week that you can. Your studies are vital.

The cost will depend on several factors. Are you pursuing your Veterinary Technology degree online or in a traditional setting? If you attend your courses on campus, you will also need to pay for food, room and board, and other fees. This can increase the cost of your Veterinary Technology education significantly unless you have a plan in place to keep these costs low. If you attend a public, state school, it will depend on whether or not you are a resident. In-state students usually pay much lower rates than out-of-state students. However, this can be overcome by attending classes online, as most institutions charge in-state rates for all online courses. Either way, you need to research the costs for each Bachelor’s Degree in Veterinary Technology program you are considering applying to, as each institution will have their own rates.

If you are going to spend a lot of time and energy to attain a Veterinary Technology degree, you will certainly want some job placement assistance as you near graduation. Discuss this with your admissions counselor when you are considering the right program. In fact, you might want to broaden that discussion by asking about how your school handles internships and if co-op programs are available. Experiential learning can help you not only gain the skills needed to land a job, but you can also cultivate a professional network that will help you build the career you deserve.